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Sheet Primary School

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Week 4 - Electricity

Today we were looking at electricity.  Mrs Beaton started off by showing us that you could magnetise a nail and how this affected a compass. 

Next Mrs Beaton got out a massive spring which looked like a slinky.  She had some really, really powerful magnets that children were not allowed to touch and she fitted these to some batteries and put the whole thing inside the spring.  One side of the battery was negative and the magnets pushed it away from the battery and the positive side would pull the battery so the batteries and magnets zoomed through the spring.

 

Next she had a block of wood which she had glued two safety pins to.  She joined the safety pins with copper wire twisted in the middle.  One of the very powerful magnets was glued to the bottom.  Then she fitted a wire with a battery so that when she pushed the copper it spun around as the electricity travelled up the copper into the ring.  When you flicked the copper it started it to spin and the magnets made it carry on.  This is like the Goblin car’s motor which is like a bigger version of this. Pushing the car gives it the boost, just like flicking the copper wire.

 

Next we split into groups of 4 and made our own lemon batteries.  We had: half a lemon; a disc of zinc; a small stick of copper; a plastic lid.  We inserted the zinc and copper through the lemon’s skin (into the flesh).  Then we attached them together with wires and the electricity travelled through the wires as zinc pulls in electrons.  It then carries on through the circuit as the copper pushes the electrons away into the next wire and so on until it reached a cooking timer.  The lemon batteries powered the cooking timer which started to work.

 

The final demonstration showed that a circuit could be drawn from pencil – a graphite B9.  On a piece of paper Mrs Beaton drew part of a circuit with gaps.  Then she taped a LED onto one of the gaps and placed a battery across the other gap and folded the paper so that the pencil line continued from positive and negative.  The LED lit up!